Metformin dosing schedule

By: Zoolander On: 05-Feb-2019
Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus <b>Metformin</b> as a first line

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Metformin as a first line

Measurement of hematologic parameters on an annual basis is advised in patients on metformin hydrochloride tablets and any apparent abnormalities should be appropriately investigated and managed (see Hypoglycemia does not occur in patients receiving metformin hydrochloride tablets alone under usual circumstances of use, but could occur when caloric intake is deficient, when strenuous exercise is not compensated by caloric supplementation, or during concomitant use with other glucose-lowering agents (such as sulfonylureas and insulin) or ethanol. Elderly, debilitated, or malnourished patients, and those with adrenal or pituitary insufficiency or alcohol intoxication are particularly susceptible to hypoglycemic effects. Hypoglycemia may be difficult to recognize in the elderly, and in people who are taking beta-adrenergic blocking drugs. Patients should be informed of the potential risks and benefits of metformin hydrochloride tablets and of alternative modes of therapy. They should also be informed about the importance of adherence to dietary instructions, of a regular exercise program, and of regular testing of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, renal function, and hematologic parameters. The risks of lactic acidosis, its symptoms, and conditions that predispose to its development, as noted in the sections, should be explained to patients. Patients should be advised to discontinue metformin hydrochloride tablets immediately and to promptly notify their health practitioner if unexplained hyperventilation, myalgia, malaise, unusual somnolence, or other nonspecific symptoms occur. Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin.

<i>Metformin</i> Dosage Guide with Precautions -

Metformin Dosage Guide with Precautions -

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day or 850 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments or 850 mg every 2 weeks as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily in divided doses Maximum dose: 2550 mg/day Extended-release: Initial dose: 500 to 1000 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2500 mg daily Comments: -Metformin, if not contraindicated, is the preferred initial pharmacologic agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. -Immediate-release: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals; titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. In general, significant responses are not observed with doses less than 1500 mg/day. -Extended-release: Take with the evening meal; if glycemic control is not achieved with 2000 mg once a day, may consider 1000 mg of extended-release product twice a day; if glycemic control is still not achieve, may switch to immediate-release product. Use: To improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. 10 years or older: Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2000 mg daily Comments: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects.

<b>Metformin</b> Oral Route Proper Use - Mayo Clinic
Metformin Oral Route Proper Use - Mayo Clinic

The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Diabetes type 2-specific dosing for Glucophage, Glucophage XR metformin. contraindications, pregnancy & lactation schedules, and cost information.

Metformin dosing schedule
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